Posted on Nov 29, 2011 | 0 comments

An amazing way to eJournal is to do it online. Special software makes it possible to keep your journal completely with your browser (ie Internet Explorer, Safari, Firefox…). Doing it in this way has several advantages including access from any computer with an internet connection, cloud backup and more features than most of us need. Popular examples include Penzu and LDS Journal, both of which I have mentioned before.

One of the most unique and noteworthy online journal is simply called 750 Words. Produced by statistically obsessed Buster Benson,750 Words not only allows users to keep daily entries for free, but tracks the progress in insanely creative ways. Your journal keeping is scored on account of how many words you write in the month and based around… wait for it… bowling. You also collect badges of various animal flavors as you succeed in your diarial adventure.

One thing I especially like about 750 Words is that it manages to integrate social features while still maintaining privacy. You can follow other journalers progress and statistics. In Benson’s own words:

I’ve tried writing my 750 words a day on Livejournal, WordPress, PBWorks, Tumblr, and all of these other sites designed around putting content online. It hasn’t worked for me. I fear that I might accidentally forget to mark daily pages as private. And it’s just weird having my private brain dumps out on various sites that are designed to be more social. I don’t need to title my entries, or tag them, or enable comments, or any of that other stuff. This is writing, and it’s online, but it’s not blogging, or Twittering, or Facebook status updating. This is between you and you.

This line of thinking is very similar to my own expressed opinion. Benson and his special site are clearly doing great things for the writing and journal keeping worlds.

While I love 750 Words and what it is doing for the thousands who have embraced it, it is hard to recommend it as a complete journal replacement. For one, it doesn’t have the ability to include pictures- a feature that I don’t know if I could do without at this point. There isn’t much customization and there aren’t yet mobile apps to use with service.

Then again, you get an amazing service for nothing more than free.

For me, perfection would be a way to upload my current journal in some form into 750 Words so that I could get the analysis that it provides. I understand this isn’t possible, especially since much of the data is collected in real time, but we can dream.

Can’t we?

Ultimately, as with most journals, your decision to use 750 Words will be based on personal preference. If it sounds even remotely interesting, I highly recommend signing up and trying it out for a while since it won’t cost you anything.

Heck, I’ll admit that while I always have a primary journal, I do use others for different purposes on occasion. There are just too many to pass up. So, make the switch to 750 Words or add it to your journal collection.

Anyone used it yet?